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Photo by Austin Distel on Unsplash

Even if your job title doesn’t include the word “manager,” there’s a good chance you’ll be expected to handle some management duty in the course of your career. As an entrepreneur, almost every responsibility in your position has some management element to it — your employees will be the ones making your vision a reality, and it’s your job to make sure they do it efficiently.

But being an effective manager is about more than just driving your employees to work harder — or even more efficiently. Forcing your employees to work a certain way can breed resentment, and even disloyalty, while being too soft can lead to bad habits, laziness, or boredom. …


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Photo by Brooke Cagle on Unsplash

It doesn’t matter who you are, where you work, what your goals are, or what you’ve done to this point. Universally, there is an inherent advantage in being a better communicator. On a team, you’ll have fewer miscommunications and stronger influence. As an employee, you’ll carry more influence and respect from your bosses and supervisors. As an entrepreneur, you’ll have an easier time managing employees, updating your partners and investors, and even securing new clients — giving your business an edge in a number of different areas simultaneously.

As we begin the next year, I encourage you to make 10 New Year’s resolutions for yourself, all of which can make you a better…


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Photo by Christian Erfurt on Unsplash

Failure is a part of life, especially for entrepreneurs. Most new businesses fail within the first few years, and even if your business is one that survives that harsh initial trial, you’ll experience plenty of smaller failures along the way.

Seasoned entrepreneurs know that no single failure could ever be enough to compromise the success of a dedicated mind. Instead, failures are merely temporary obstacles in a long journey. They are experiences to be learned from, and mistakes that improve our abilities.

As you develop yourself as a business owner and work to achieve your goals, you’ll inevitably experience these seven…


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Photo by Chris Gilbert on Unsplash

Congratulations — you can assert your business has made it through another year — or maybe even its first year. But if you want to continue that streak of success, you need to commit to being a better entrepreneur next year than you were this year.

Maintaining a constant line of development means always honing your skills, learning new ones, and giving yourself more possibilities — so why not make some New Year’s resolutions for next year that will make you a better all-around entrepreneur?

Here are some of my top suggestions:

1. Make time for your physical health first. You spend so many hours at the office and there’s so much on your plate that you can’t even think about taking care of yourself. That needs to stop. No matter how busy your schedule gets or how much you want to accomplish in the business world, you have to make time for your own physical health first; you have to eat healthier meals (and eat regularly), get enough sleep every night, and exercise at least a few times a week. Keeping yourself in better physical shape will keep you in better mental shape, which means you’ll be able to do more in the hours that remain. Besides — what does business success matter if you’re sick and stressed all the time? …


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Photo by Charlz Gutiérrez De Piñeres on Unsplash

Isn’t technology fantastic? We have so many devices, programs, and tools to help us become more efficient workers. We have a seemingly infinite bank of knowledge at our fingertips, and in a matter of seconds, we can connect with almost anyone in the world.

It all sounds so perfect when you describe it like that, but unfortunately, technology has some powerful downsides to go along with its benefits. …


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Photo by Merakist on Unsplash

Social media has become a popular (and profitable) marketing tool for new and experienced entrepreneurs. Establishing an account and building an audience organically costs only time, and most platforms offer reasonably priced advertising options for those who want a little extra push. When used in conjunction with an SEO and content marketing campaign, it can be even more powerful, and it’s especially useful for new, emerging, or changing businesses to spread the word quickly.

However, social media isn’t a marketing channel to be taken lightly, nor is it a guaranteed win for your business. To be successful, you need to be aware of social media’s abilities as well as its limitations, and you need to have a clear strategy throughout your campaign. It’s easy to forget some of these considerations when you’re focusing on the possibility of rewarding results, but you must remember them if you want to be successful. …


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Photo by Austin Distel on Unsplash

Marketing is a practical necessity for all businesses — big, small, new, and old — but unlike an area that’s fairly cut-and-dry (like accounting), it’s a bit more qualitative in its approach. There are dozens, if not hundreds of different strategies to choose from, and conflicting information can sometimes be an issue in trying to make sense of those strategies.

As a result of this qualitative, less-than-predictable nature, there are several myths that persist in the entrepreneurial community. There are big myths, like the idea that marketing is only a tool to increase sales, and smaller myths, like the one that paid advertising is the only way to get seen on social media. …


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Photo by Quino Al on Unsplash

Have you ever heard the statistic that 90 percent of businesses fail within the first year? Maybe you heard that it was in the first 5 years, or that it’s actually 80 percent of businesses, but chances are you heard a number like this at some point in your life, without much direct evidence to back it up.

It’s certainly true that the majority of new businesses do fail — only a minority ever find success — but the stats aren’t nearly as dramatic as some would have you believe. …


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Photo by Lubo Minar on Unsplash

Many successful entrepreneurs note the importance of taking risks to build a successful business. On some level, it makes sense; if you choose a risky business model when no one else does, you’ll face less competition, and if you fail, you can always try again. On top of that, higher financial risks often come with higher rewards, meaning a successful attempt at a risk is met with a higher payoff.

But it’s important to understand that “risk” may not be the best concept for prospective entrepreneurs to consider — instead, it might be better to consider a similar, yet distinct idea: uncertainty. …


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Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

Introversion and extroversion are signature traits that ordinarily define how a person prefers spending their time. Introverts tend to prefer quiet, solitary, and introspective experiences, while extroverts prefer energetic, collaborative, and social environments. Clearly, neither is inherently better than the other, but for introverts, entrepreneurship can be especially challenging.

Does this mean introverts can’t be entrepreneurs?

Absolutely not. In fact, there are some breakout examples of introverts who became some of the most successful business owners in history.

The Introvert’s Plight

Why do introverts struggle in an entrepreneurial position to begin with? For starters, entrepreneurs tend to do better when they’re charismatic, a trait usually associated with extroversion. Charisma helps you make more connections, inspire your employees, earn more trust faster, and grow your audience. Being social and outgoing also helps you meet new people at networking events (or even attend them in the first place), and the entrepreneurial lifestyle is an overall chaotic and noisy one — something few introverts prefer. …

About

Jayson DeMers

CEO of EmailAnalytics (emailanalytics.com), a productivity tool that visualizes team email activity, and measures email response time. Check out the free trial!

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